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This pathway will walk us through the basics of banks, starting with some of the different types and their main functions, then starting to look at the regulation faced by the banks, both before and after the Global Financial Crisis.

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Greenwashing is the act of distributing false information about something being more environmentally friendly than it actually is.

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In this video, Max discusses the cost-of-living crisis currently enveloping the UK. He examines its impact on households as well as the overall economy.

CSR and Sustainability in Financial Services

In the first video of this two-part video series, Elisa introduces us to sustainability. She begins by looking at the difference between sustainability and corporate social responsibility, two terms that can be easily confused.

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What are Medium-Term Notes? II

What are Medium-Term Notes? II

Aya Suzuki

15 years: Capital markets

In the second part of Aya's video on Medium-Term Notes (MTNs), she discusses the benefits of issuing MTNs, explains the dealer's role and identifies the key buyers.

In the second part of Aya's video on Medium-Term Notes (MTNs), she discusses the benefits of issuing MTNs, explains the dealer's role and identifies the key buyers.

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What are Medium-Term Notes? II

8 mins 42 secs

Key learning objectives:

  • Identify why companies issue MTNs, and who buys them

  • Outline the role of a dealer in issuing MTNs

  • Identify the motivation for a company to consider an inaugural private placement

Overview:

A Medium-Term Note is a form of privately placed debt in a bond format. They are especially useful to those people wishing to raise funds quickly, such as asset managers. A MTN dealer acts as an intermediary to an investor, executes transactions and provides hedging.

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Summary

Why do companies issue MTNs?

Benefits include:
  • Time of access to raise funds
  • Flexibility on terms and costs
  • Confidentiality

Companies issue MTNs because it allows borrowers to complement other funding sources, such as public market funding or loans. Consider a UK-based issuer whose funding needs are predominantly in British pounds, with only 100 million Euros. As they have fewer assets in the euro area, 100 million Euro is too small for a benchmark transaction, but works well for an MTN trade.

What does a dealer do?

Dealer - Typically an investment bank that arranges the transaction for the borrower and acts as an intermediary to an investor.

  1. Dealers generate interest for MTNs
    • Helping issuers to achieve their funding objectives.
  2. Dealers execute transactions and provide hedging
    • For example, a typical MTN transaction where the issuer is a European bank and the investor is a European life insurance company is a fixed-rate note. However, if the issuer wants to pay a floating rate linked to a Euro benchmark rate but the investor wants to receive annual fixed rate coupons, the dealer on the transaction will arrange to exchange cash flows through the interest-rate swap market.
  3. Dealers assist the closing and settlement of MTN transactions
    • Dealers are typically responsible for initiating and leading the documentation process.

Who buys MTNs?

  1. Life insurance companies
    • Life insurance companies are large MTN buyers, especially at long maturities. Insurers need long dated assets that match their long-dated liabilities
  2. Asset managers
    • They appreciate the readiness of MTNs, which allows them to invest whenever they have excess cash

What is the motivation for a company to consider an inaugural private placement?

  1. As the company grows, it may appreciate further flexibility on the terms of its borrowing 
    • Banks typically lend up to 5 years, however, the company may be able to borrow longer dated money from the institutional investor base. Also, bank’s do not lend money without collateral, while institutional investors can lend money on an unsecured basis.
  2. The company may wish to diversify the source of borrowing
    • If market conditions are favourable, particularly if interest rates are low across major markets.
  3. The company may consider a private placement as a stepping stone to future capital market transactions
    • Through the process of issuing a private placement, the company will have direct interactions with institutional investors and thus can start building new relationships with them.

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Aya Suzuki

Aya Suzuki

Aya has spent 12 years at UBS Investment Bank. She started as a fixed income salesperson, covering institutional investors in Japan. In her second year, she moved to London and joined the Debt Syndicate desk within DCM, where she spent the following 11 years. There, Aya was in charge of origination, distribution and execution of private placements.

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