The Importance of Whistleblowing

The Importance of Whistleblowing

Evidence of the term ‘whistleblowing’ and the modern connotations it has today can be found as early as the 1500s in England. Encouraging openness and willingness to ‘blow the whistle’ within companies is now a key component of a healthy firm and ensures customers are treated fairly. If employees are encouraged to be open, then they can prevent incidents from happening and bad behaviour from snowballing. It is important that senior managers cease viewing whistleblowing as something negative, but rather something that can improve business performance and reduce external risk.
Overview

Evidence of the term ‘whistleblowing’ and the modern connotations it has today can be found as early as the 1500s in England. Encouraging openness and willingness to ‘blow the whistle’ within companies is now a key component of a healthy firm and ensures customers are treated fairly. If employees are encouraged to be open, then they can prevent incidents from happening and bad behaviour from snowballing. It is important that senior managers cease viewing whistleblowing as something negative, but rather something that can improve business performance and reduce external risk.

Key learning objectives:

  • Understand the origin of the term whistleblowing

  • Learn what the concept of whistleblowing means today

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Summary
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Expert
Christian Hunt

Christian Hunt

Christian is the founder of Human Risk, a Behavioural Science led Consulting and Training Firm. Previously, Christian was Managing Director at UBS, and Head of Behavioural Science (BeSci), within the Bank’s Risk function. Prior to joining UBS, he was Chief Operating Officer at the UK’s Prudential Regulation Authority.

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