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This pathway will walk us through the basics of banks, starting with some of the different types and their main functions, then starting to look at the regulation faced by the banks, both before and after the Global Financial Crisis.

Greenwashing

Greenwashing is the act of distributing false information about something being more environmentally friendly than it actually is.

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Tackling the Cost of Living Crisis

In this video, Max discusses the cost-of-living crisis currently enveloping the UK. He examines its impact on households as well as the overall economy.

CSR and Sustainability in Financial Services

In the first video of this two-part video series, Elisa introduces us to sustainability. She begins by looking at the difference between sustainability and corporate social responsibility, two terms that can be easily confused.

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Banking Essentials - Part I

This pathway will walk us through the basics of banks, starting with some of the different types and their main functions, then starting to look at the regulation faced by the banks, both before and after the Global Financial Crisis.

Greenwashing

Greenwashing is the act of distributing false information about something being more environmentally friendly than it actually is.

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Expert led content

+1,000 expert presented, on-demand video modules

Learning analytics

Keep track of learning progress with our comprehensive data

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Engage with our video hotspots and knowledge check-ins

Testing & certification

Gain CPD / CPE credits and professional certification

Managed learning

Build, scale and manage your organisation’s learning

Integrations

Connect Finance Unlocked to your current platform

Featured Content

More featured content

Tackling the Cost of Living Crisis

In this video, Max discusses the cost-of-living crisis currently enveloping the UK. He examines its impact on households as well as the overall economy.

CSR and Sustainability in Financial Services

In the first video of this two-part video series, Elisa introduces us to sustainability. She begins by looking at the difference between sustainability and corporate social responsibility, two terms that can be easily confused.

More featured content

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The Three Categories of Unintended Consequences

The Three Categories of Unintended Consequences

Paul Orlando

25 years: Systems specialist

In this video, Paul talks us through the three main categories of unintended consequences, i.e., "Unexpected benefits", "Unexpected drawbacks" and "Perverse results"

In this video, Paul talks us through the three main categories of unintended consequences, i.e., "Unexpected benefits", "Unexpected drawbacks" and "Perverse results"

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The Three Categories of Unintended Consequences

10 mins 45 secs

Key learning objectives:

  • Understand the three main categories of unintended consequences

Overview:

There are three categories of unintended consequences. The unexpected benefit, which is a positive but unplanned outcome, The unexpected drawback, in which we create a problem that is apart from the problem we wish to solve, And perverse results, wherein in trying to solve a problem, we actually make it worse.

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Summary

What are the three main categories of unintended consequences?

  • Unexpected benefits - With this category of unintended consequence no second-level thinking is involved. Once we notice the outcomes, those outcomes should be direct and predictable.  We can often make these so-called “unexpected benefits” happen again if we take the same actions. Unexpected benefits of some sort are impossible to not find as long as you think broadly and creatively. They are simpler to understand, perhaps, because the benefits created often do not involve the actions of people.

  • Unexpected drawbacks -  This type of unintended consequence occurs when the goal was to improve “A” and we later learn that in the process, we made “B” worse. These are also referred to as “externalities.”

  • Perverse results - ‘Perverse Results’ happen when our goal was to improve “A” but we actually make “A” worse. These are often the most frustrating category of unintended consequences.

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Paul Orlando

Paul Orlando

Paul's writing on "unintended consequences" comes from his work delving into the systems that he works to impact. He is the founder of Startups Unplugged, a consulting firm devoted to helping large organizations execute with the speed of startups. To do this, Paul often builds startup accelerators and incubators, helping organizations generate more revenue and enabling communities to attract new businesses. He is adjunct professor at the University of Southern California, running the institution's Incubator and in the past built other innovation programmes globally including AcceleratorHK in Hong Kong and the Laudato Si startup incubator in Rome. Paul graduated from Cornell University and Columbia Business School.

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